Floating Shapes Gracefully Form Into Abstract Visual Portrayals of Music Being Played by Musicians


Nebula” by Polish filmmaker Marcin Nowrotek is a gorgeously fluid animation in which floating shapes provide abstract visual portrayals of the sounds coming from a saxophone, piano and bass, with each given a unique visual signature. These individual shapes lead back to the musicians playing their instruments as a means of identification before drifting upward, around and into each other as designated by the song.

NEBULA is an experiment that aims at finding the link between two trends that develop simultaneously in the history of film – Lumières concept of a movie as a record of reality and Méliés’s idea that uses the film as a tool for creation of imaginative worlds. NEBULA draws from both of these approaches and becomes a combination, collage, in which the recorded figurative picture is intermingled with abstract compositions being the graphic equivalent of music.

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A Fabulous Vintage Cabaret Cover of ‘The Final Countdown’ by Europe

Postmodern Jukebox joined up with stunning Swedish jazz musician and multi-instrumentalist, Gunhild Carling, to perform a fabulous vintage cabaret cover of Europe‘s 1986 song “The Final Countdown.” Carling belted out incredible vocals and played her trombone with fierce power. Their cover is available to purchase from iTunes. Here is the …

Bill Nye the Science Guy Offers a Humorous Tutorial on Scientific Slang, Expressions and Jokes

While promoting his PBS POV special, a rather forthright Bill Nye sat down with Vanity Fair to humorously define a series of scientifically specific slang, expressions and jokes that he’s userd throughout his career. Bill Nye teaches you scientific slang words and terms. Find out what “arsole,” “hinny,” “champagne tap” …

A Clever Animation That Explains the Heights and Purposes of Each Layer of the Earth’s Atmosphere

While many of us have a nebulous familiarity with the universe, a very clever animation by the Royal Observatory Greenwich explains the height and purposes of the different layers of the Earth’s atmosphere before it is officially considered to be “space”. These layers include the troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere, and the …