The Ill Effects of Drinking Way Too Much Coffee


Too Much Coffee

Life Noggin, narrator Pat Graziosi who voices the animated Blocko recruited the help of Craig Benzine aka Wheezy Waiter to discover what would happen if coffee were his only sustenance and how much coffee would he have to drink to cause a caffeine overdose. Luckily, there was a cartoon version of Wheezy Waiter available to help test out the theory to the maximum.

Caffeine overdose can induce comas after about 5 grams of consumption, but, one study found that just 1 gram a day significantly increases your risk of sudden cardiac arrest. Less severe effects include fever, trouble breathing, convulsions, and cardiac distress. …No one knows for sure how much coffee is deadly. One 30-year study found that drinking more than 28 8oz cups of coffee per week leads to a 50% increased risk of death in young men and about a 200% increase in young women.


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